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Lick Observatory

E. S. Holden, director of the Lick Observatory, was courting Barnard for his staff as early as 1886. Barnard was so eager to begin work that he report many months ahead of time for his job, only to find that the observatory was not yet completed. Once his work at the observatory commenced, he came into frequent conflict with Holden over the latter's reservation of the 36-inch telescope for his own work. When Barnard finally obtained the use of the telescope, he discovered Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter.


letter, April 26, 1886

 


April 26, 1886

Letter from Director E. S. Holden to Barnard, alluding to upcoming staff positions at the Lick Observatory.

 


Lick Observatory

 

Lick Observatory, Mount Hamilton, California.

 


Barnard, equatorial telescope

 

 

Barnard at the lens of the 6 1/2-inch equatorial telescope. 


 



June 1, 1888



June 1, 1888

Regulations for the Lick Observatory.  Director Holden’s reservation of the 36-inch telescope for his own research work brought him into regular conflict with Barnard.

 


36-inch Refractor Telescope

 


36-inch Refractor Telescope

The 36-inch refractor telescope Barnard used to discover Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter, on September 9, 1892.

 


September 22, 1892

 

September 22, 1892

Letter from Ella Poole to Barnard, congratulating him on the discovery of Amalthea, the fifth moon of Jupiter.

 


 residence,  Lick Observatory



Barnard’s residence at Lick Observatory.

 


September 21, 1892

 

September 21, 1892

Letter from Barnard to Joseph Carrels, thanking him for the encouragement Carrels gave him as a child.  Written shortly after his discovery of Amalthea.