Richard France Biographical File

Summary Information

Repository
VUMC Historical Images and Biographies
Title
Richard France Biographical File
Extent
0.0 Cubic feet
Abstract
Biographical file includes curriculum vitae.

Preferred Citation

France, Richard (1905-1993). Eskind Biomedical Library Special Collections, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

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Historical or Biographical Note

Richard France was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 18, 1905. He received his undergraduate degree from Princeton University in 1926 and M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1930. He completed several residencies at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, and in 1934 established a private practice in Cardiology in his home city. Dr. France joined the U.S. Navy in 1940 and served in the South Pacific during World War II. He retired from the the Navy in 1965 with the rank of captain.

In 1946, Dr. France moved to Nashville, Tennessee, to work at the Thayer Veteran's Administration Hospital. From 1946-1963 he served as Chief of the Medical Service and from 1963-1969 as Chief of the Cardiology Section. Dr. France also held an appointment in the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical School.

Dr. Richard France wrote many medical articles in the field of cardiology. He also collected rare medical books and donated much of his collection to the Vanderbilt Medical Library. Dr. France and his wife moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, to spend their retirement years.

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Administrative Information

Notes about Access to this Collection

All collections are subject to applicable VUMC privacy and confidentiality policies.

Reproduction Rights

Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

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Subject Headings

Other Keywords - Digital Library Subjects

  • Cardiology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Military Medicine
  • VUMC History

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