Mary de Garmo Bryan Papers
Collection Number 11

Summary Information

Repository
EBL Manuscripts Collection
Creator
Bryan, Mary de Garmo, 1891-
Title
Mary de Garmo Bryan Papers
Date [inclusive]
1865 - 1974
Extent
1.5 Cubic feet
Abstract
Personal papers of editor, dietitian, and nutrition advisor Mary de Garmo Bryan. She served as an Army dietitian in France during WWI and was a pioneer in the development of the school lunch program in the United States. Materials include: manuscripts, reprints, correspondence, pamphlets, and notes. Two copies of Dr. Bryan's dissertation are contained in the collection.

Preferred Citation

Mary de Garmo Bryan Papers. Eskind Biomedical Library Special Collections, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

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Historical or Biographical Note

Mary de Garmo Bryan (1891-1986) was an editor, dietitian, and nutrition advisor. Dr. Bryan was a pioneer in the development of the school lunch program in the United States.

Mary de Garmo Bryan was born in Warrensburg, MO in 1891. She graduated in 1912 from Newcomb College, and then earned a master's degree from Washington University in 1913. Dr. Bryan was professor of home economics at Agnes Scott College from 1913-1915 and an instructor in dietetics at the University of Illinois from 1915-1916. She then served as an Army dietitian in France during WWI from 1917-1919. From 1921-1924 she was editor of the Journal of Home Economics. She also was the President of the American Dietetic Association from 1920-1922. She earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from Columbia University in 1931. Dr. Bryan was chairman of the department of institutional management of Columbia University Teachers College from 1934-1951.

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Collection Scope and Content Summary

Personal papers of editor, dietitian, and nutrition advisor Mary de Garmo Bryan. She served as an Army dietitian in France during WWI and was a pioneer in the development of the school lunch program in the United States. Materials include: manuscripts, reprints, correspondence, pamphlets, and notes. Two copies of Dr. Bryan's dissertation are contained in the collection.

Collection also contains articles, pamphlets, and manuscripts created by other nutritionists. Materials pertaining to Mary Swartz Rose include a manuscript about Mary Swartz Rose by Dr. Bryan, reprints of articles by Rose, and photographs of Mary Swartz Rose.

Most of the collection relates to nutrition and the history of nutrition. However, there are typed notes about John Dudley's funeral expenses in 1580 taken from a manuscript roll in possession of the Earl of Liecester. Also unrelated to nutrition is a Xerox copy of the "Scheme of Instruction" from the first Vassar Catalog 1865-1866.

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Administrative Information

Notes about Access to this Collection

All collections are subject to applicable VUMC privacy and confidentiality policies. Collection specific restrictions: No Restrictions.

Reproduction Rights

Copyright is retained by the authors of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

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Subject Headings

Personal Name(s)

  • Bryan, Mary de Garmo, 1891-

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)

  • MeSH Cookery
  • MeSH Dietetics--history
  • MeSH Military Medicine
  • MeSH Nutrition

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Collection Inventory

Series 01: Reprints  

Box Folder

Reprint. Rose, Mary Swartz. "Diet." from Fit To Teach. Ninth Yearbook. Department of Classroom Teachers, National Education Association, n.d.

Scope and Contents note

Reprint. Rose, Mary Swartz. "Diet." from Fit To Teach. Ninth Yearbook. Department of Classroom Teachers, National Education Association, n.d. Off-print. Burnet, Et. and Aykroyd, W.R. "Nutrition and Public Health," Quarterly Bulletin of the Health Organization, League of Nations. vol. IV, no. 2, June 1935.

1 1

Typed manuscript. Bryan, Mary de Garmo. "Some New Dimensions in a Half Century Since Mary Swartz Rose Came to Teachers College," Mary Swartz Rose lecture. April 24, 1964.

1 1

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